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, for her introduction of this bill and her comments honoring the memory of mr. kling. he truly was a caring, a compassionate and a loyal person and a loyal friend that made everyone who crossed his path feel as though they were the most special person he knew. finally, mr. speaker, when we announced that legislation to rename this facility at the facility, there was some veterans standing out in front waiting to go in. and they asked what the hubbub was about. they asked why all the tv cameras and i explained to them who bill kling was and why this was being done. they were grateful to know and veterans just like those veterans when they walk through the front door, will not only learn about bill kling but his example for continuing to work hard every single day for his fellow veterans. what a great honor we're bestoge on his family and by -- destowing on his family. -- bestowing on his family. i ask my colleagues to support this bill honoring this great american. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida. mr. miller: i have no further speakers. the speaker pro tempo
of the united states senate, i will present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband. our gift to her because he gave so many gifts to us. he was a lion in the senate, a real american hero. though gentle in style, he was a fierce warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. when he received his medal of honor, he was rising to the call of the sirens at pearl harbor, volunteering to serve his country, putting aside his own dreams to be a physician. but he went on to be a healer of many wounds. he was decorated in world war ii for saving his fellow soldiers. my experience with senator inouye as a friend was that he was a devoted, dedicated public servant. he was hawaii's first representative of the nation's newest state. he was the first person of japanese heritage ever to be elected to the senate. imagine. he himself knew what it was like to break barriers and to break boundaries. when he came to the senate, he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. he fought tirelessly to improve their lives. now his style was one of absolute civility. he was the
the wife--his wife found out. in one of her diaries, it says, one day, 'spoke to p. about mrs. r.,' and that's the last mention of mrs. r. in mrs. morgan's diaries. so i think that was a fairly dramatic moment. he then had to kind of keep it more secret, and he was not--it's interesting, he was--he lived very--he was much more of a european than an american puritan about all this. the european aristocrats had mistresses. they would travel to other friends' country houses, they would stay in european hotels. they trusted their friends not to talk. it was sort of accepted, especially in the prince of wales' set. he had these women with him, he traveled, and everybody knew about it, and nobody really talked about it. and i think morgan sort of did more or less the same thing. but once his wife found out, it was a problem. and the other problem was that this mrs. randolph was relatively young and not wealthy and she needed a husband, and morgan was not going to get divorced. so a rather convenient solution came along. another prominent american man of their world was william c. whitn
that it is. we really can do without her leadership and support. also, my colleague, mr. tom mcnaught. the work that we have done to not be possible without him. but after the assassination, the taping was dismantled. and everyone said that the secretary mood of the executive office building. the tapes went to a variety of storage locations. robert kennedy actually used them for his book, "thirteen days". there is the reel to reel tapes and the dictaphone. 1983 so we have the first opening, and it is really a fact that the system was actually installed and 62, and 2012, we open and declassify the very last tape. but the entire collection is now open. this book that he had worked on is was the first one to include all of the tapes. >> and if one of these fine people want to go browsing, where would they go? they would go here. >> that's right. people can go to her digital archives now uncertain. on the educational portion of our website, we have a whole website where they come to life and you get to do activities on him. you can actually come to our research room. some people still com
and tough lows of this job. so i want to thank her. also, mr. speaker, our two great sons, austin and andrew. they have shared me with thousands of constituents for several years that they have grown into amazing young men, young men that i think will in their own right make a difference as they work their way through their lives. and, mr. speaker, i want to also thank some amazing staff. two it it it names, dozens over many years, four in particular -- too numerous to name, dozenings over the years, some who worked with me the entire years i worked in this congress, jeremy, who has staffed the foreign affairs committee for me, and the oversight subcommittee, also has been my chief of staff in the washington office. jim who has been my district director and long time friend and colleague until st. louis. suzanne arthur, who has been my deputy director. and kathy walz from missouri, former mayor there, but invaluable part of our constituent outreach team. many other staff, but those in particular, thank them for their long and loyal service and the difference they made in so many people's liv
. just let's get started. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i think the gentlelady. i also think her for 15 years. we talked about having union station is a true intermodal center. we used to have our people come to the greyhound station to three plot, drag their luggage to union station. we used to go around town to take a bus with satellite location. ms. norton was with me and in 15 minutes we got it done, dedicated, came up for that jury in a very heated election. they thank you for your leadership. not the secretary come but the deputy secretary was instrumental in making nation's capital headteacher intermodal center. i think both of you. ms. edwards. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank all of our witnesses today and particularly thank secretary lahood. i understand it's your birthday. i don't think i would've chosen to spend my birthday with you, but i'm glad you've chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion today about high-speed rail. we had a chance to begin a half ago to go up to new york and less amtrak, but
is inside that memorial. she just tweeted about her big sister. carly soto tweeted, going to meet mr. obama. wish vicki was here. dressed in all my big sister's clothes looking cute in honor of sissy. her sister, vicki, was that first grade teacher who quickly thought on her feet and protected as many of her little 6 and 7-year-olds as she possibly could. in fact, police later found seven of those youngsters sort of huddled surviving in a closet in that first grade classroom. we know that according to vicki's cousin, quote, she instinctively went into action when a monster came into a classroom and tried to protect the kids she loved so much. we want the public to know that vicki was a hero. let me tell you about another hero, the principal. donna hochsprung, 47 years of age. had been at this elementary school for two years. she was passionate. she loved children. the children loved her. she had a smile on her face. this one friend says she was a tough woman but a tough woman in the right sort of way, and security was a priority for her. again, she had been there for two years. she had alre
i did not support her politically, i would support the lady she has been, kind and gentle. mrs. schmidt has managed to disagree with so many of the differences we have in policy and yet the first thing that you would ever see on her face is a smile, asking, how are you feeling? and having a genuine concern about that. and i personally will miss you and miss the greetings we had for each other, sharing each other's family experiences and it's really a classic example of showing what this great body used to be, and what it can become when people can just take a few minutes and realize that we may all come from different political philosophies but we are still brothers and sisters and children of god and i also want to thank the judge for giving me this opportunity to speak to the great buckeye delegation. thank you so much. >> i'd like to -- mr. tiberi: i want to recognize the gentleman from pennsylvania. >> i'd like to recognize the members of the ohio tell gation, mr. steve austria, he's become a good friend a tireless advocate for ohio and his district but even more important
processing many cases handcuffs are removed from a brief time from mr. jones and then he suddenly attacked the officer, tackling her to the ground and striking her on the head and removing her department issued firearm from her holster. >> two police sergeants went into that room. shooting ensued. the man who grabbed the weapon was dead. he she worked -- >> harris: how about the wounded officers, how are they doing? >> sergeant james gasher was the most seriously injured. he was hit multiple times in the chest and below the bullet proof vest. he underwent surgery and at this hour said to be in stable condition. sergeant kevin klein was struck in the belt and suffered a laceration. a bullet also grazed his head. and officer burns, whose gun was grabbed by the suspect was shot in the foot. all are now on administrative leave. and and that is standard procedure when police are involved in a shooting. when asked about the incident at a news conference, the county prosecutor said it appears that all the officers acted in self-defense and were justified in returning fire. harris? >> harris: davi
. >> the next president of the united states. >> reporter: if he was reluctant to run, mr. romney seems to have been under some pressure at home to seriously rally recover. last summer ann urged her husband to enter the race despite his failed bid. >> i was the first one to say this time, you have too do this again. yes, it was going to be painful. yes, it was going to be hard. yes, we might fail, but we had to go forward. >> reporter: a discussion of desire and defeat still lingering. ron mott, nbc news. become hellish for traders. as fiscal cliff talks drag into the 11th hour with $600 billion in tax hikes and spending cuts due to kick in early next year, lawmakers will get back to the table later this week after house speaker john boehner's plan b failed to get enough republican support for a vote last week. >>> still, the market has been resilient. despite friday's decline, the s&p 500 posted its best week in four. and with just five trading sessions left in 2012, the dow has advanced 8% while the s&p 500 climbed 13. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. >>> reports are due this week on pending home s
allies. >> reporter: in private, there was tension. reagan urged her to negotiate, but she wanted victory. mrs. thatcher said "she was sure that the president would act in the same way if alaska had been threatened." to get what she wanted, the iron lady used her softer side. "dear ron," she writes, "i think you are the only person who will understand the significance of what i'm trying to say." >> very personal. >> absolutely. >> reporter: mrs. that th thatcher's charm offense worked and they remained friends long after they left power. nbc news, london. >>> an elementary school crush blossoms into true love. we'll tell you about a roman more than 20 years in the making. cue the music. first, this is "today" on nbc. >>> still to come, a record number of holiday gifts are expected to be returned this year. where some of those end up might surprise you. >>> plus, we'll look back at 75 years of "weekend today." >>> live pictures right now. it's a calm and quiet start to the day. get ready. we have some snow and rain moving in. so far, the area already seeing a dusting. we're going to check
for the president because he is generally very active but he is in good spirits. meanwhile, mrs. bush, who is 87, has been making two trips a day here to visit her husband. willie, at this point there is no timeline set for the former president's release. back to you. >> janet shamlian, thanks i know we add our name to the long list of people wishing the president well. >>> after what's been a disappointing holiday season, mara ca sharaschiavocampo has tt story. >> reporter: last minute sales. early numbers show the lowest growth in years, many still found a way to buy for everyone on their list. one of the most popular ways to shop, online. >> online was the big surprise. early indications showed they're in 16%, 17% growth rates and that's big news for them. >> big ticket items brought in big bucks. flat screen tvs, laptops and tablets all did well early on. the gift that stepped out above the rest didn't even make the top ten last year, shoes. >> the big surprise this holiday season was the footwear business. running shoes did really well. classic sneakers did really well. >> reporter: with th
president of the united states. >> reporter: if he was reluctant run, mr. romney seems to have been under some pressure at home to strongly reconsider. last summer, his wife, ann, told nbc's natalie morales, she urged her husband to enter the 2012 race despise his failed bid in 2008. >> i was the first one to say this time you you have to do this again. yes, it was gonna be painful. yes, it was gonna be hard. yes, we might fail. is but we had to go forward. >> reporter: a discussion of desire and defeat still lingering. ron mott, nbc news, boston. >>> we turn overseas to an awful scene in syria. dozens of people were killed, some of them children and many more hurt in an air strike while they waited to buy bread at a bakery. it appears to be one of the deadliest aerial attacks in that country's nearly two-year-long civil war. >>> and in india today there were mass protests in new dellism police used tear gas and water cannons on thousands were ho were demanding justice for a young woman who was raped and beaten by a group of men on a bus. the attack took place a week ago and it sparked di
there is a tendency to form that blood clot. >> in the case of mrs. clinton we know that during an earlier illness she became light-headed, fainted and then hit her head and cuncussed. could it be a side effect of the concussion. >> concussion in adults it is not a known cause of venous signus thrombosis. in children sometimes it makes them sus-- susceptible. and given it is an uncommon condition, five in a million it is not a common condition at all. so i doubt it was directly related to concussion because in general, it is not known to be caused by that. but among possible causes, again, you are allowed it to speculate, it would be ruled out some of them like pregnancy or if there is any tendency of a blood disorder, a tendency to hypercoagulate,. >> suarez: so what do we do in treatment? and is it a long course of treatment? >> yes and no. if there is, for example n someone pregnant or just gave birth and maybe has thrombosis, about three to six months of anti-coagulation or using blood thinners would be enough. if there is no particular cause, the range from 6 to 12 months. and there are condition
of need. that's what we've always done, and that's what we must do now. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut. mr. blumenthal: thank you mr. president. i want to first begin by thanking my colleague from maryland senator mikulski, for her very kind and generous words about the recent tragedy that we suffered in connecticut and her sense of compassion and kindness in the remarks that she just made but also thank her for her vision and courage and leadership on the legislation before us and associate myself with the very eloquent and powerful remarks made by both senators from new york and the senator from new jersey today and i want to strongly oppose the amendments that would constrict and delay aid that is vital to connecticut as it is to the other states of the region that was hammered and pummelled by storm sandy in the night that it hit our area. the scope and scale of destruction made it one of the largest natural disasters to affect our nation. it left millions of people without homes or electricity. it cost tens of billion
. >> in the case of mrs. clinton we know that during an earlier illness she became light-headed fainted and then hit her head and cuncussed. could it be a side effect of the concussion. >> concussion in adults it is not a known cause of venous signus thrombosis. in children sometimes it makes them sus-- susceptible. and given it is an uncommon condition, five in a million it is not a common condition at all. so i doubt it was directly related to concussion because in general it is not known to be caused by that. but among possible causes again you are allowed it to speculate, it would be ruled out some of them like pregnancy or if there is any tendency of a blood disorder a tendency to hypercoagulate,. >> suarez: so what do we do in treatment? and is it a long course of treatment? >> yes and no. if there is for example n someone pregnant or just gave birth and maybe has thrombosis, about three to six months of anti-coagulation or using blood thinners would be enough. if there is no particular cause the range from 6 to 12 months. and there are conditions when it is unlimited. so to some
the taliban on an apache helicopter. taping her christmas message in 3d. >> i wish you all a very happy christmas. >> reporter: describing all the outpouring in 2012 as humbling. >> good evening, mr. bond. >> good evening, your majesty. >> reporter: action-packed year to be royal, indeed. >> that was nbc's michelle kosinski. i don't know about you, erica. but i, too, spent christmas with commoners. >> so nice of you to give back to the people a little bit. >> my uncle herb. >> i'm sure he appreciates that, too. they do gag gifts apparently, so i wanted to give you this. it's not really a gag. you were interested in the tweezers. >> why do i need the light on it? >> for when you're tweezing your brow, doing preshow -- >> go ahead. i didn't know what that means. >> if you need to finish up afterwards, just -- >> taking care of business over there that needs to be attended to? >> how about that? you can actually see what you're plucking. >> technology at work. >> use them in good health. >> thanks. >>> fun facts you may not have known about your holiday cocktail. little info before you go
on her way back home from school in september. they went to queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham, england, where malala is recovering. mr. zudare wanted to see the young girl's condition for herself and pay tribute to her courage and steadfastness. >> former south african president nelson mandela is in the hospital. he was admitted to the hospital to undergo tests. it says mandela is doing well and the tests are just routine for someone his age. mandela is 94 years old. we'll have a live report from johannesburg, south africa, next hour. >> it's the strongest tropical cyclone to hit the philippines in decades, but it's not over yet. people are faced with the task of rebuilding their lives. we'll look at how they're coping. ♪ (announcer) when subaru owners look in the mirror, they see more than themselves. so we celebrate our year-end with the "share the love" event. get a great deal on a new subaru and 250 dollars goes to your choice of five charities. by the end of this, our fifth year, our total can reach almost 25 million dollars. it's a nice reflection on us all. now throug
and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved it, every minute of it. mrs. monroe hated it. absolutely hated it. >> she warned her husband -- you cannot rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> and during the statement, you were a little breathless and there was too much looking down, and i think it was a little too fast. not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> she's probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies. they never shared the marriage. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said, "i myself never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband." now, you stop and think about how much power that is. it is a lot of power. >> part of the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we looked at these bugaboos and made it possible for countless people to survive and to flourish, as a result. i do not know how many presidents, realistically, have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i a
and audition in 1991 to play my wife in "mr. saturday night." she gave a fantastic greeting but she was a little too young. i called her agent and said she's not going to get the part but she's phenomenal. she's a great actress, so cute so beautiful. she's everything. >> yeah. >> so then when we said who could blake her, i said -- she comes into the same office that she auditioned for me and, yeah -- she said now? >> she said now am i too old? >> our scenes together are like father/daughter. >> i still remember you from "my cousin vinny." what was that iconic line. >> my biological clock. >> you know how to do comedy you now how to do drama. do you like dog one more than the other? >> i love doing comedy. i had the greatest time on the film. i love being with these guys and it affirmed for me this is what i want to do. i want to do comedies. comedies comedies. but sometimes, you know -- >> why did it take time from the time she walked in to i have a brilliantied. >> you are billy crystal. >> you reach a certain age where they don't terrorist you like they used t
is -- socially adept and politically savvy. dolley madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe hated it. >> she wants her husband, you cannot rule without including what women want and women have to contribute. >> during this statement, you were a little breathless and there was too much looking down. i think it was a little too fast. not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> probably the most tragic of all forced ladies -- first ladies. >> she later wrote it in her memoir that she never made any decision, i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. you stop and think about how much power that is. it is a lot of power. >> prior to this battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and made it possible for people to survive and to flourish as a result. i do not know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i am constantly reminded about all the people who have lived there before, and particul
as you go forward. mr. chairman, i ask your kindness in just one thing, and that is to commend commissioner clyburn for her work on -- [inaudible] calling petitions before the commission. i appreciate the progress the commission has made on these petitions and encourage the commission to resolve these matters as expeditiously as possible. mr. chairman, members of the commission, thank you for your courtesy to the committee today. >> thank you, mr. dingell. mr. barton, you're recognized. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i'm tempted to yield back to mr. dingell just to let him continue asking his yes or no questions. sooner or later, he'll fete to one that -- he'll get to one that they can't answer. but chairman dingell did ask a question that i'm going to put a little bit different slant on. he referred to that part of the h.r. r. 3630, the new law, that the commission in making these reassignment or reallocations shall make every effort, every reasonable effort to preserve the existing population and coverage area for each broadcast licensee. over on the next page, on page 72, subpa
in a book called the "friendly fire" about the death of her son a young army private. general schwartzkopf was the army commander and he was so human and approachable to mrs. mullen. it was impressive. clearly he was an impressive guy. tell us your thoughts and memories of general sworts co h schwartzkopf. >> he was an impressive guy. i he met him when i whe was a mr and i was a lieutenant. i had an unpleasant experience with him during which i was trying to exercise my authority and responsibility. he is a higher ranking guy telling me, no, i he wasn't going to do it. i lost. it was a fair fight, even though he's three times my size. he's a really tough guy. one of the interesting things about him that is unfortunately not practiced frequently in the military or anywhere else, by the way, is that he always led from the front sometimes recklessly, and the mistakes that we all make in combat from time to time and we've all made our share, him included, is that we have a tendency to miscalculate. we go left instead of right. we wait too long and don't wait long enough for ninformation. he m
senior during the period, before he graduated and left, only one person can remember her at all. the others constantly never saw. so \mr.{-|}\mister, what was that? she left. >> how long was she in seattle? >> guest: about a year and a half it as a single mother with, yes, and she had babysitters and she went to school part-time. got herself back together. that first semester at university of wide was the difficult because she got pregnant. so she had to sort of reveal herself on academically, and she did at the university of hawaii. and after barack, sr. had left hawaii to go to harvard, she and little barrie came back. >> host: 1962-19 safety seven they were back in honolulu. who was her second husband? >> guest: her second husband was another international guy. he was in indonesia. she met him at the university of hawaii. he was from the east-west center. brought americans the honolulu to prepare to go to asia for study. and that's where she met him. he was a tennis player. she fell in love with lolo. >> host: at what point did the move to jakarta? >> guest: he went back firs
to work next week. mrs. clinton has not been seen in public in about two weeks. she's been recuperating at home since suffering a concussion. it happened when she hit her heard during a fainting spell brought on by a stomach virus. >>> overseas now, the united states has temporarily shut down its embassy in the central african republic. rebels advance on the capital and the state department is warning americans to avoid the republic. u.s. citizens already there are told to leave and there are no plans to evacuate u.s. military personnel. >>> now to a terrifying scene for shoppers in friday. if you are afraid of sharks, you may not want to watch this video. this was an indoor tsunami. a huge shark tank burst, sending broken glass and water crashing into onlookers. more than a dozen people were injured. sadly, the sharks did not survive. >> who thought that was a good idea? >>> the economy could suffer a major blow next week if thousands of union dock workers make good on their threat to strike. a walkout would close every port from boston to houston. that means tons of goods would not be
, dropped from public view until her death in july. >> you haven't answered the question, mr. president. >> from space to time, mike wallace spent 60 years mostly on "60 minutes" and most often afflicting the comfortable with his confrontational style of journalism. wallace died in april. another television star, dick clark, was the maker of teen idols on "american bandstand" and rang in the new year for america for nearly four decades. as familiar as the whistle that opens his tv show, andy griffith planned to be a preacher or opera singer but settled on acting which he did up until his death in july. when larry hagman was shot as j.r. ewing on "dallas," it was the most watched point in his career that gan -- began on "i dream of jeannie." and joe paterno was sullied by the child sex abuse scandal at penn state that broke just before his death in january. etta james died in january 50 years after her version of "at last" became a must at millions of weddings. whitney houston died in february. ♪ i will always love you ♪ >> donna summer, in may. and some unique sounds fell silent, to
as you go forward. i asked to commend the commissioner for her work on prison, the petitions. i appreciate the progress made and encourage the commission to resolve these matters as quickly as possible. mr. chairman, members of the commission, thank you. >> thank you. mr. barton, you are recognized. >> thank you. i am tempted to yield back to mr. dingell and let him continue asking his yes or no questions. sooner or later, he will get to one they cannot answer. the chairman asked a question that i will put a different slant on. he referred to that part of the hr 3630 that the commission, in making these reassignment or reallocations, shall make every effort, every reasonable effort to preserve the existing population and coverage area for each broadcast licensee. on the next page, 72, said the paragraph 5, with regard to low- power television usage, it says nothing in this subsection shall be construed to alter the spectrum. in the fcc power point presentation in response to the question can low-power television participate in a reverse auction, the answer to that is no. i under
of her statement rather than the latter part. we have a good report. mr who seeks recognition, mr. bishop. you are recognized. >> thank you very much. i wanted to say thank you for the hard work of the last 20 months. we may not agree on a lot of things that certainly transportation is important to you. i commend you, you look like you are 30 years old. to summarize the rail, just about every weekend -- this is really important to me. i am a writer and icy how it is all the time, i wish we had superspeed, absolutely. it takes 2-1/2 hours to get to washington d.c.. could we make a lot better? absolutely. this region, the northern region is a very congested area. and if you really want to see it, drive up once in awhile and get on the georgia turnpike on exit 1 and you will see how you want to get back on the train because it is so congested. i would hope that in the future we can really seriously think about high speed rail. this is a region of the country that generates jobs, and more important than anything else have the ridership to sustain such an investment. so i look forward to worki
she saved so many kids' lives. >> reporter: i spoke with the parents of a student who saw mrs. soto get shot and they still haven't told their son about her ultimate fate because they think that after everything that's happened this week and everything else that he has seen, including some of his classmates being shot, that they think it's too much to handle at this time. and president obama is going to be here this evening for an interfaith vigil at newtown high school and he's going to try to help heal the community who seems to feel worse with every new piece of information that comes out. >> they were first graders, they were doing kids stuff. it's the kind of stuff you'd send your kids or your grandkids out the door out to first grade. >> and again, counseling will be available at a nearby intermediate school in the gym. we're told that there are grief counselors from across new england and therapy dogs and there's food, a memorial buildingen last night before they wrapped things up for the day, there were about a hundred cars in the parking lot. back to you in new york. >> ali
, says her boss won't be leaving the hospital anytime soon. he is in intensive care with complications from bronchitis. but she says the 88-year-old mr. bush would advise to put the harps back in the closet. because he's getting excellent treatment. >>> and secretary of state hillary clinton will return to work next week. she hasn't been seen in public since suffering a concussion about two weeks ago after a fainting spell brought on by a stomach bug. >>> and the fiscal cliff in washington isn't the only major threat to the u.s. economy. this morning, time is running out to avoid a strike by 14,000 dockworkers from boston to houston for demanding better pay. 14 ports which handle half of the nation's shipping traffic are threatened. workers could walk off the job this sunday, costing the economy an estimated $1 billion per day. >>> and for the second time this month, someone has been pushed to their death on a new york subway. a woman seen running away on the left side of this surveillance video, right here, shoved a man on to the tracks last night. he was then crushed by an oncoming t
of the nurse who took her own life after getting duped by their prank call. >>> good morning, to you. welcome to "early start." welcome back, mr. berman. >> it is great to be here. i was on vacation for a week. now i'm back. i'm john berman. it is 5:00 a.m. in the east. i am feeling that. but this, they are talking for the first time in over three weeks. president obama and house speaker john boehner looked each other in the eye and actually had a conversation. now that's a really big deal when it comes to the fiscal cliff crisis. because in just 22 days americans face severe tax hikes and spending cuts unless these two leaders can find a way to compromise. now neither side would discuss specifics about their conversation. but after yesterday's white house meeting, a spokesman for the president said "the lines of communication remain open." now that may be music to the ears of former white house chief of staff erskine bowles, one half of the bowles-simpson reduction duo. >> they started a tango now. you know, any time you got two guys in there tangoing, you have a chance to get it done. >> br
audiences as a reality tv show star on her kaecable show. this month she signed with abc to head lean her comedy series. she had five children and two grandchildren. larry jacobs, abc new, new york. >>> president obama on the road today trying to sell his plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. mr. obama speaks to workers at an engine factory near detroit this afternoon. yesterday the president and house speaker john boehner met at the white house for a round of intense negotiations. there are new signs republicans are willing to go along with the president on hypertaxigher taxee wealthy. >> we have spent ourselves into a hole. will i accept a tax increase as part of a deal to actually solve our problem, yes. >> senator coburn says in return, republicans would get significant reform of entitlement programs. >> at least the two are sort of together, speaking, without cameras around. >> right. >> so they can get work done. >> the difference between the last meeting, they're not coming out and sort of saying, well, they're not budging. they're not budging. they sort of cam out and said we are not go
that she took. i listened to her, and i believe that is the kind of leadership to help us continue down this path. >> thank you. senator? >> thank you. thank you for your testimony today mr. secretary. i know the senator asked about reverse mortgages. i am concerned about that issue. i am particularly concerned that $2.80 billion of the $16 billion economic shortfall are related. can you talk a little more about why these losses are so severe? >> here is the fundamental problem, without getting into too much detail. the loans were generally variable rate and allowed the borrower. there is basically no option for them to do anything but draw the full amount. >> why? >> we do not have the statutory authority to be able to make the changes to the program to allow us to limit the draw up front. that is the change we are asking to be made. our alternative, and i was just discussing this, we could basically eliminate or put a moratorium on our regular program, which is somewhat safer. the problem is we do not have that authority under that program to avoid the full-draw feature of it. the rig
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